Jason Shilling Kendall: Citizen Astronomer

William Paterson University
Amateur Astronomers Association of New York
Hunter College

Lunar Eclipse Visible across the entire USA.

Sunday night, September 27, starting at about 9:00 PM Eastern Time

On Sunday night, September 27, starting at about 9:00 PM Eastern Time and going until about half-past midnight. Here is the current time, including the vital Universal Time. Astronomers across the world use it to know when things will happen.

Countdown to the Lunar Eclipse!

Current Universal Time:
Current Eastern Time:
Current Central Time:
Current Mountain Time:
Current Pacific Time:

The times on the Eclipse are exactly as follows in UTC Time:

  1. UTC Sept. 28 01:07:11:
    • Deepest part of the eclipse starts.
    • (This is where you see the curvature of Earth's shadow.)
  2. UTC Sept. 28 02:11:10:
    • Moon begins full eclipse.
  3. UTC Sept. 28 02:47:07:
    • Moon is at maximum eclipse.
  4. UTC Sept. 28 03:23:05:
    • Moon ends full eclipse.
  5. UTC Sept. 28 04:27:03:
    • Deepest part of the eclipse ends.
    • (This is where you see the curvature of Earth's shadow.)
The above data were computed by Fred Espanak of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

Where can I go to see it?

You can just go outside, but many astronomy groups will be holding events. I've put together a list of locations that will be doing events. If you want yours added, send me an email, with the exact street address.

What will I see?

Here are some images of the Lunar eclipse on March 3, 2007

This animation comes from the Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio


William Paterson University Department of Physics American Astronomical Society Amateur Astronomers Association of New York Astronomical Society of the Pacific